Tuesday, April 18, 2006

the good old days

I fondly remember that my political and musical awakenings happened virtually simultaneously, back in the late Sixties and early Seventies. Back then, rock musicians formed an almost united front in the push back against the hideous mistake of our involvement in Viet Nam. Songs like "War" by Edwin Starr, "Give Peace a Chance" by John Lennon, and "Fortunate Son" by Creedence Clearwater Revival all represented the opposition of the young people in this country to American imperialism run amok.

For the last couple of years, the Dixie Chicks were really the visible face of the musical anti-war (which really is a good idea, think about it) cadre, and they were castigated for it and people are still telling lies about how damaging their public distaste for George W. Bush was to their careers. For the record, they have made a lot of money after their dustup a couple of years ago, not lost money.

We now have our second entrant into the anti-war musical crowd.

Neil Young.

Yes, the Neil Young that is the Young in Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. You know, the guys from the FIRST Woodstock, the one I went to at Max Yasgur's farm in August of 1969.


Apparently, there aren't many young people against the war. Just a lot of them that haven't bothered to support with their blood and tissue the ass-kicking rhetoric that they type on their multitudinous MySpace and Xanga sites. The ones that are not enlisting in such large droves that the US military is practically accepting oxygen-deprived serial killers in order to barely meet their requirements for IED fodder in the Fertile Crescent.


Neil Fucking Young.

Thank you, Neil. You are STILL an American patriot. Although I have to admit, I had hoped that you would be able to pass the torch to the young people by now.

2 Comments:

Blogger Ronni said...

Didn't he start out being a Canadian?

It sucks to have to fight the same battle over and over again, just because we've raised such a complacent and complicit generation!

9:01 AM  
Blogger Mary K. Goddard said...

I think you're right-I think he was he was Canadian.

And don't forget Country Joe McDonald's immortal protest song... Gosh, Milo, did you see that one live? Maybe it's time for someone to revive-redux that tune. I suppose that would be a little too much to add to your set list...

11:28 AM  

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